Placing the “Care” in Foster Care

You’ve heard the news and read the headlines. Foster care in Oregon is in disarray, resulting in personnel changes, increased oversight and sanctions. These are appropriate responses to an imminent issue.  But if you are an 8-year-old boy taken from your home due to abuse or neglect and placed into the home of someone you’ve never met, you need a caring, stable support system. If you are a foster parent opening your home to someone else’s child, you need more than a “thank you”. You need to feel respected and supported in this role.

Children are taken into care in Oregon for good reasons. The majority of foster parents are wonderful people doing very hard work to make their home feel like “home” to these displaced children. The majority of case workers at the Department of Human Services (DHS) dedicate their life’s work to help children in need. Yet they are faced with heavy and complicated caseloads that exceed the number of hours in the day.

While some solutions to these problems are difficult, many are not. Foster parents can be provided with childcare to receive respite from the challenges of day-to-day life. They can be provided additional training, in settings that work for them, where they can talk to other foster parents. They can have a 24-hour call line, so someone can provide help, support or advice at any time. These solutions come with relatively inexpensive price tags, while providing foster parents with the feeling of support and respect that they deserve.

While caseworkers are overloaded, DHS is only funded at 85% of the positions they are allotted. This means that if DHS were funded for the staffing levels they need, caseloads could be reduced. More caseworkers could be working with children in a more-timely fashion, offering them the support and care that they deserve. Children in state care should be truly cared-for by the state, and funding DHS at a full 100% of staffing level for $21.9 million would help to do just that.

Most of us will never know what it is like to be a child taken from your home and put into someone else’s. Most of us will never know what it is like to open your home to a vulnerable child in need at a moment’s notice. Most of us will never know what it is like to feel like you could work for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and never give children you are responsible for enough time and attention. But there is something we can do for them all: demand better. Demand the funding to truly support foster care.

EmailFacebookTwitterShare